Aspen Grove Mission

Aspen Grove assists individuals in their quest for perfection by providing a wholesome, educational/recreational environment that enriches lives and cultivates the Spirit of the Y.

Objectives

1. Strengthen alumni families and friends by providing wholesome recreational activities through the family camp program.
2. Provide an innovative educational environment and experiences for the BYU community including students, alumni, faculty, staff, and selected external publics.
3. Serve the youth of the church and potential alumni through educational conferences and leadership-oriented programs.
4. Cultivate the Spirit of the Y.

Staff Mission

We cultivate the spirit of the "Y" through giving extraordinary service and by creating a place that is safe, wholesome, and excellent.

Standards & Policies

Standards

All camp guests will be asked to abide by the standards of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. This includes high standards of moral character, honesty, respect for personal and property rights, obeying the law, dietary laws of abstaining from alcoholic beverages, tobacco, tea and coffee, no drug abuse, living the law of chastity, and high standards of taste and decency.

General

Smoking is not permitted inside the facilities or on camp premises. Coffee and alcoholic beverages are not allowed. The management reserves the right to evict any guest for unacceptable behavior or destruction of property. The management is not responsible for lost or damaged articles on camp grounds or in the rooms. Please refrain from bringing pets into camp. Please be environmentally minded and help us conserve water.

Disabilities

Please notify our office if you are coming to Aspen Grove and have a disability that requires reasonable accommodation, such as hearing, visual or mobility impairment, chronic illness, a life-threatening communicable disease, or a nervous, emotional, mental, learning, or other disability.

Disclaimers

The Alumni Association/Brigham Young University assumes no responsibility or liability for any loss, damage or other injury to persons or property in connection with your group's participation in Aspen Grove programs and activities. The presence of your group in camp and/or participation in camp activities indicates a knowledge of, and an assumption of, the resulting risks involved. All participants are, therefore, urged to be sure that they are in satisfactory physical condition to perform the camp activities to be engaged in by them and to secure appropriate medical and personal injury and property damage insurance coverage prior to their arrival at camp.

History of Aspen Grove

The late Eugene L. Roberts began using the area of Aspen Grove for the starting point of the annual Timp Hike in 1911, first linking Brigham Young University (BYU) with Aspen Grove. About 10 years later, the Stewart family donated approximately 35 acres of this land to BYU.

In 1922, BYU scheduled the Alpine Summer School at Aspen Grove. Both staff and students lived in tents and studied botany, zoology, and geology. A kitchen, dining hall, and three dormitories were erected in 1923. Later, during World War II, summer school was abandoned at Aspen Grove for various war-related reasons.

Raymond Beckham, director of the BYU Alumni Association, became interested in using Aspen Grove as an alumni family camp in 1956. The project was approved at a board meeting held on October 10, 1962. More than 111 alumni were approached, and each signed a personal note for $1000 to finance construction.

Construction began in the fall of 1962. The swimming pool was excavated, the softball field leveled, sewer lines started, cabin sites selected, and camp roads established. The camp's popular dinner bell came from a 3500 series coal-fired steam engine donated by the Union Pacific Railroad. The camp opened for business July 13, 1963. During the first years of camp, Aspen Grove served approximately eight families each week.

Aspen Grove has been in operation since 1963, over 50 seasons, and has grown to an average occupancy of 80 families per week. The camp personnel serve as hosts to thousands of guests each year.